TROPICAL STORM WARNING CANCELED: Tropical Storm Isaias, August 2, 11 PM

Our Weather  |  August 2, 2020

The Town of Palm Beach is NO LONGER UNDER A TROPICAL STORM WARNING

Tropical Storm Isaias weakened and slowed overnight.  The maximum winds are now 70 mph with a forward speed of 9 mph.The eye of the storm is just north of the St. Lucie Inlet.

 

SERT Tropical Update 8-2-20 11AM


Latest from WPTV


Tropical Storm Isaias


In anticipation of a potential impact from Hurricane Isaias, staff has been busy for the past few days going through their departmental check lists to ensure the Town is fully ready to react to any level of an impact.  The executive team met early this morning to review the current forecast and finalize preparations in the event we are impacted by a tropical storm or hurricane.  As the storm moves closer the potential impacts become more predictable.

Based upon the information available at this time, we do not anticipate mandatory evacuations. We will continue push out information to the public as new information becomes available or as necessary. Although this appears to be a low level storm event, some of our residents may start to have increased levels of anxiety, confusion or concern, particularly as the storm moves closer. We encourage our residents who have legitimate questions or concerns to call 561-838-5454 or they can send an email to questions@townofpalmbeach.com. The preceding information will be included in an alert.

I can assure you all that our management team and staff is well versed in emergency management of hurricane events.

Thank you, Kirk

Kirk Blouin

Town Manager


Palm Beach County EM Conference Call with Municipalities on Isaias – Notes

  • Forecast confidence should increase as storm becomes more organized as models do better with more organized storms.
  • Current forecast is for coastal tropical storm force winds that will begin Saturday evening.  Storm is moving fast, and should be cleared out on Sunday.
  • No major surge anticipated.  Beach erosion is anticipated.
  • Rainfall range of 3-5 inches.
  • County Attorney is recommending separate states of emergency be declared for COVID and for Isaias.
  • County State of Emergency for Isaias will be emailed out.
  • Encourage residents to stay at home.
  • County preparing to open 4 shelters, including pet friendly shelter (no owners), only if needed.

From: Darrel Donatto 

Isaias strengthened overnight, becoming a Category 1 Hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 80 mph.  Additional strengthening to a Category 2 Hurricane is forecast over the next 48 hours as Isaias nears the East Coast of Florida.  Tropical Storm Watches are in effect for Palm Beach County and additional watches and warnings are possible today.

There is still some uncertainty in whether the system comes ashore in Florida or if it remains offshore. Currently, the track takes the storm across the western Bahamas, approximately 60 miles offshore of the Town of Palm Beach.  As of the 5 am forecast, we are only anticipating tropical storm force winds in the Town at this point.  Adjustments in the track and intensity forecast are still possible. Small shifts in the track will have a large changes in the impacts.

Heavy rains from Isaias in Palm Beach are expected to begin Friday night.  Minor coastal flooding is expected, as the storm surge of 1 – 2 feet is forecast.  High surf of 8 – 11 feet is expected along east coast beaches starting Friday afternoon.

Tropical Storm force winds from Isaias are expected to impact Palm Beach Saturday night.


BULLETIN
Tropical Storm Isaias Advisory Number  24
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL       AL092020
1100 PM EDT Sun Aug 02 2020

...ISAIAS EXPECTED TO BE NEAR HURRICANE STRENGTH WHEN IT REACHES 
THE CAROLINAS...


SUMMARY OF 1100 PM EDT...0300 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...28.5N 79.8W
ABOUT 50 MI...80 KM E OF CAPE CANAVERAL FLORIDA
ABOUT 365 MI...585 KM S OF MYRTLE BEACH SOUTH CAROLINA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...70 MPH...110 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NNW OR 345 DEGREES AT 9 MPH...15 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...995 MB...29.39 INCHES


WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY:

The Tropical Storm Warning has been extended northward to Fenwick
Island Delaware, including Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. A
Tropical Storm Warning has also been issued for the Chesapeake Bay
from Smith Point southward.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT:

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for...
* Edisto Beach South Carolina to Cape Fear North Carolina

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for...
* Cape Fear to Duck North Carolina
* Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for...
* South Santee River South Carolina to Surf City North Carolina

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for...
* Sebastian Inlet Florida to Fenwick Island Delaware
* Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds
* Chesapeake Bay southward from Smith Point

A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for...
* Fenwick Island Delaware northward to Watch Hill Rhode Island
* Chesapeake Bay north of Smith Point
* Tidal Potomac River
* Delaware Bay
* Long Island and Long Island Sound

Interests elsewhere along the northeast coast of the United States
should monitor the progress of Isaias.  Additional watches or
warnings may be required tonight or early Monday.

A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening
inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline,
during the next 36 hours in the indicated locations. For a depiction
of areas at risk, please see the National Weather Service Storm
Surge Watch/Warning Graphic at hurricanes.gov.  This is a
life-threatening situation.  Persons located within these areas
should take all necessary actions to protect life and property from
rising water and the potential for other dangerous conditions.
Promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local
officials.

A Storm Surge Watch means there is a possibility of life-
threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the
coastline, in the indicated locations during the next 48 hours.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible
within the watch area.  A watch is typically issued 48 hours
before the anticipated first occurrence of tropical-storm-force
winds, conditions that make outside preparations difficult or
dangerous.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
expected somewhere within the warning area, generally within 36
hours.

A Tropical Storm Watch means that tropical storm conditions are
possible within the watch area, generally within 48 hours.

For storm information specific to your area in the United
States, including possible inland watches and warnings, please
monitor products issued by your local National Weather Service
forecast office. For storm information specific to your area
outside of the United States, please monitor products issued by
your national meteorological service.


DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK
----------------------
At 1100 PM EDT (0300 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Isaias was
located by an Air Force Hurricane Hunter aircraft near latitude 28.5 
North, longitude 79.8 West. Isaias is moving toward the 
north-northwest near 9 mph (15 km/h), and this general motion is 
expected to continue through tonight.  A turn toward the north and 
north-northeast along with an increase in forward speed is 
anticipated on Monday and Tuesday.  On the forecast track, the 
center of Isaias will pass just to the east of the Florida east 
coast through tonight.  The center of Isaias will then move offshore 
of the coast of Georgia and southern South Carolina on Monday, move 
inland over eastern South Carolina or southern North Carolina Monday 
night and move along the coast of the mid-Atlantic states on 
Tuesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph (110 km/h) with higher 
gusts.  Some fluctuations in strength are possible during the next 
36 hours, but Isaias is expected to be a strong tropical storm when 
it reaches the coast of eastern South Carolina or southern North 
Carolina Monday night.  Slow weakening is forecast after Isaias 
makes landfall in the Carolinas and moves across the U.S. 
mid-Atlantic region late Monday and Tuesday.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 115 miles (185 km) 
from the center.  A 51 mph (82 km/h) wind gust was recently 
measured at NOAA buoy 41009, just off the coast of Cape Canaveral. 
NOAA buoy 41010, located about 130 miles (210 km) east-northeast of 
Cape Canaveral reported sustained winds of 49 mph (79 km/h) with a 
wind gust to 63 mph (101 km/h) within the past couple of hours.

The estimated minimum central pressure is 995 mb (29.39 inches).


HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
Key messages for Isaias can be found in the Tropical Cyclone
Discussion under AWIPS header MIATCDAT4, WMO header WTNT44 KNHC, and
on the web at www.hurricanes.gov/text/MIATCDAT4.shtml.

STORM SURGE:  The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the
tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by
rising waters moving inland from the shoreline.  The water could
reach the following heights above ground somewhere in the indicated
areas if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide...

Edisto Beach SC to Cape Fear NC...2-4 ft
Sebastian Inlet FL to Edisto Beach SC...1-3 ft
North of Cape Fear NC to Kiptopeke VA including Pamlico Sound,
Albemarle Sound, Neuse River, Pamlico River, Chesapeake Bay, and
the Tidal Potomac River...1-3 ft

The deepest water will occur along the immediate coast in areas of
onshore winds, where the surge will be accompanied by large waves.
Surge-related flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge
and the tidal cycle, and can vary greatly over short distances.
For information specific to your area, please see products issued
by your local National Weather Service forecast office.

WIND:  Hurricane conditions are possible in the watch area in South
and North Carolina Monday night and early Tuesday.

Tropical storm conditions will spread northward within the Tropical
Storm Warning area from Florida to North Carolina through Monday
night.

Tropical storm conditions are possible in the Tropical Storm Watch
area beginning on Tuesday.

RAINFALL: The following rainfall accumulations are expected along
and near the track of Isaias:

Northwest Bahamas: Additional 1 to 3 inches, isolated storm totals
12 inches.

Eastern Florida: Additional 1 to 2 inches, isolated storm totals 4
inches.

Coastal Georgia: 1 to 2 inches.

Carolinas and the mid-Atlantic: 3 to 6 inches, isolated maximum
totals 8 inches.

Southeast New York and much of New England: 2 to 4 inches, isolated
maximum totals 6 inches.

Heavy rainfall from Isaias will continue to result in potentially
life-threatening flash flooding in the Northwest Bahamas through
tonight.  Flash and urban flooding, some of which may be significant
in the eastern Carolinas and the mid-Atlantic, is expected through
midweek along and near the path of Isaias across the East Coast of
the United States.  Widespread minor to moderate river flooding is
possible across portions of the Carolinas and the mid-Atlantic.
Additionally, quick-responding rivers in the southern Appalachians
and Northeast will be susceptible to minor river flooding.

SURF:  Swells generated by Isaias are affecting portions of the
Bahamas and the southeast coast of the United States and will spread
northward along the U.S. east coast during the next couple of days.
These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip
current conditions.  Please consult products from your local weather
office.

TORNADOES:  A few tornadoes will be possible over coastal South
Carolina during the afternoon and evening on Monday, and across
eastern North Carolina Monday evening and overnight.
National Hurricane Center
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