• This Week in Palm Beach - November 22, 2017
  • Thank You from Our Chairman, Bob Wright
  • UPDATE 11-21-2017: President Trump to Spend Thanksgiving at Mar-a-Lago [Video]
  • Temporary Road Closure & Adjusted Traffic Patterns Around Mar-a-Lago
  • Advance Notice of Southern Blvd. Bridge Overnight Lane Closures

 

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This Week in Palm Beach - November 22, 2017
Get the news that is important to you in This Week in Palm Beach. November 22, 2017 edition. Click Here To See Original Full E-Newsletter
Thank You from Our Chairman, Bob Wright
A letter from our Chairman, Bob Wright:
UPDATE 11-21-2017: President Trump to Spend Thanksgiving at Mar-a-Lago [Video]
President Trump will spend Thanksgiving at Mar-a-Lago. Roads were roadblocked with checkpoints by 8:30 am on Tuesday, November 21.
Temporary Road Closure & Adjusted Traffic Patterns Around Mar-a-Lago
Town of Palm Beach News Release -- Beginning at 8:00 am on Tuesday, November 21, the process of shutting roadways down will be initiated. The closure will be in effect through Sunday, November 26 until after the President leaves. 
Advance Notice of Southern Blvd. Bridge Overnight Lane Closures
FDOT News Release -- The westbound lane of Southern Boulevard Bridge will be closed from 9:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. nightly on the following dates:
This Week in Palm Beach - November 17, 2017
Get the news that is important to you in This Week in Palm Beach. November 17, 2017 edition. Click Here To See Original Full E-Newsletter
Civic Association Holds Forum on Hurricane Recovery & Underground Utilities
By Michele Dargan, Special for the Civic Association -- The Palm Beach Civic Association hosted a community forum Thursday morning on hurricane recovery and underground utilities.
Inlet Maintenance Dredging is Set to Begin – Sand Going on North Beaches
By Michele Dargan, Special for the Civic Association -- The process of putting $8 million worth of sand on north end beaches - at no cost to the town through inlet maintenance dredging - will begin Friday by moving equipment onto the beach, said Coastal Program Manager Rob Weber.
Top Stories
This Week in Palm Beach - November 22, 2017
Posted by Stephan Nilson
Published: Tuesday, 21 November 2017 17:49

Get the news that is important to you in This Week in Palm Beach. November 22, 2017 edition.

Click Here To See Original Full E-Newsletter

Happy ThanksgivingTo subscribe to This Week in Palm Beach and receive it in your inbox, CLICK HERE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thank You from Our Chairman, Bob Wright
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Tuesday, 21 November 2017 12:07

A letter from our Chairman, Bob Wright:

Dear Friends,

The Palm Beach Civic Association is grateful for the support of our Directors and Members who have provided the resources to grow our organization, and enrich the community with advocacy, educational forums, and signature events.

For 74 years, the Association has stood by its mission to enhance the quality of life for the residents and businesses in our extraordinary town. Today we are the largest civic focused organization on the island, and well positioned to ensure that the quality of life will remain for generations of Palm Beachers to come.

StanHeadshotLeadership begins with our citizens; on September 27th, the Civic Association lost a remarkable leader, Stanley M. Rumbough, Jr. In memory of Stan’s forty plus year commitment, and his key role in the development of the Civic Association and its policies, we have dedicated our 2017- 2018 Season in his honor.

Image: Stanley M. Rumbough, Jr.

We extend our gratitude to the Rumbough family for designating the Palm Beach Civic Association as the recipient of charitable gifts in Stan’s memory. We also wish to thank our members and friends who have already remembered Stanley M. Rumbough, Jr. in this significant way.

During this season of giving, we ask that you kindly consider a year-end gift to the Palm Beach Civic Association in memory of those who have built our organization throughout the years. Your tax deductible donation will honor our founders, our leaders, and our future.

With best wishes for a warm and festive holiday season,

Bob Wright PBCA 417 0687 2017HeadshotBob Wright
Chairman
Palm Beach Civic Association

 

Image: Bob Wright

 

 

 

Top Stories
UPDATE 11-21-2017: President Trump to Spend Thanksgiving at Mar-a-Lago [Video]
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Tuesday, 21 November 2017 10:00

President Trump will spend Thanksgiving at Mar-a-Lago. Roads were roadblocked with checkpoints by 8:30 am on Tuesday, November 21.

The closure will be in effect until Sunday, November 26. Protests started around 11:15 Tuesday morning with protestors walking across the Southern Blvd. bridge, only to be turned back by police on Bingham Island. The protestors cooperated.

The President is expected to arrive roughly around 5:15 p.m. on Tuesday, November 21 and leave around 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, November 26th, according to the VIP Movement Notification that was issued by the FAA.

The notices are typically issued ahead of planned visits by the president to give other pilots advanced warning of possible restrictions in a particular area.

Kirk Blouin, director of public safety, said Wednesday the town was discussing when its traffic plan would go into effect. He said the plan would be the same as at the end of last season.

Image: Ocean Blvd (A1A) is expected to be blocked off before, during, and shortly after the visit.

A big difference is now there is construction fencing all along both sides of the Southern Blvd. approach to Mar-a-Lago because of the bridge construction. Heavy equipment, construction materials, and worker parking are behind those fenses.

"Southern Blvd. Bridge construction is continuing as planned," said Angel Gardner, public information officer for FDOT. "There are no changes to the schedule. The contractor is planning to work their normal hours Monday through Wednesday. All FDOT construction projects will be shut down for the holiday weekend from Thursday through Sunday."

Protests are planned but they will not be allowed to cross Southern Blvd. from West Palm Beach onto Bingham Island. 

The president has travelled to his own properties since taking office in January. Early on, he frequented Mar-a-Lago, but eventually began travelling to his golf club in Bedminster, N.J. after Mar-a-Lago closed for the summer.

President Trump has spent 25 days of his presidency at Mar-a-Lago, where he has hosted world leaders, including Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Chinese President Xi Jinping.

WPTV NBC5 [1:31]

 

 The Coast Guard also set up security zones in certain areas of the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean around Mar-a-Lago. They'll be in place Tuesday afternoon until Sunday night:

• Center Zone: This zone is always in effect. This zone consists of waters of the Lake Worth Lagoon 700 yards north of the Southern Boulevard Bridge ending at the north tip of Fisherman Island and 200 yards to the south of the Southern Boulevard Bridge ending at Flagler Promenade S Road. No vessel or person will be permitted to enter the center zone without obtaining permission from the Coast Guard or a designated representative.

• West Zone: This zone is always in effect. This zone consists of waters of Lake Worth Lagoon 700 yards north of the Southern Boulevard Bridge ending at daybeacon "20" and 200 yards to the south of the Southern Boulevard Bridge ending at Flagler Promenade S Road. All vessels transiting the west zone shall maintain a steady speed and shall not slow or stop in the zone.

• East Zone: This zone is always in effect. This zone consists of waters of the Atlantic Ocean from Banyan Road in the north to Ocean View Road in the south and from shore to approximately 1000 yards east. All vessels transiting the east zone shall maintain a steady speed and shall not slow or stop in the zone.

 

Top Stories
Temporary Road Closure & Adjusted Traffic Patterns Around Mar-a-Lago
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Monday, 20 November 2017 13:58

Town of Palm Beach News Release -- Beginning at 8:00 am on Tuesday, November 21, the process of shutting roadways down will be initiated. The closure will be in effect through Sunday, November 26 until after the President leaves. 

During the closure period, all forms of travel, including pedestrian travel, are prohibited on S. Ocean Blvd from the intersection of S. County Road to Southern Boulevard. The travel restrictions will also extend eastward to the ocean. If you are a resident living south of the South Ocean Blvd. and South County intersection you will be granted access with proper credentials.

Please take note of the new temporary traffic patterns and bridge openings that will be in effect while President Trump is in Town.

ALL MOTORISTS SHOULD REFRAIN FROM CELLULAR PHONE USE TO ASSIST IN THE MOVEMENT OF TRAFFIC.

Traffic Patterns:

If you are traveling South on S. County Road or S. Ocean Boulevard: You will be redirected north at the intersection of S. County Road and S. Ocean Boulevard. There will be traffic cones and barricades directing you back north.

If you are traveling East on Southern Boulevard: You will only be allowed to exit south onto S. Ocean Boulevard at the Southern Causeway.

If you are traveling North on S. Ocean Boulevard: You will have to exit onto westbound Southern Boulevard at the Southern Causeway.

To assist with the afternoon rush hour period, bridge openings will be modified to permit 1 opening per hour as follows for the weekdays only (except Federal holidays):

Flagler Memorial Bridge: Openings at 2:15 pm, 3:15 pm, 4:15 pm, and 5:15 pm.

Royal Park Bridge: Openings at 2:30 pm, 3:30 pm, 4:30 pm and 5:30 pm

Southern Boulevard Bridge: No schedule change, but the bridge will remain closed until the presidential motorcade passes.

All Bridges: On demand opening for barges.

If you have any questions regarding traffic, please contact the Palm Beach Police Community Relations Department at 561-838-5467.

 

 

Top Stories
Advance Notice of Southern Blvd. Bridge Overnight Lane Closures
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Sunday, 19 November 2017 13:02

FDOT News Release -- The westbound lane of Southern Boulevard Bridge will be closed from 9:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. nightly on the following dates:

• Monday, Nov. 27, to Thursday, Nov. 30
• Sunday, Dec 3., to Thursday, Dec. 7
• Sunday, Dec 10, to Thursday, Dec. 14
• Sunday, Dec. 17, to Thursday, Dec. 21

Flaggers will maintain two-way traffic in the eastbound lane – one direction at a time – to allow crews to perform exploratory drilling for the replacement bridge foundations.

The Southern Boulevard (SR 80) Bridges Replacement Project includes replacing the existing bascule (draw) bridge and tide relief bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway (ICWW) and Lake Worth Lagoon between the Town of Palm Beach and the City of West Palm Beach. The project limits are between Washington Road in West Palm Beach and State Road A1A/South Ocean Boulevard in Palm Beach. New decorative lighting, pedestrian features, traffic signals, signage and drainage are included. A temporary bridge will be built north of the existing bridge to maintain traffic while the replacement bascule bridge is under construction. Active construction began April 3, 2017, and will last until early 2021. The estimated construction cost is $93 million.

Contact Information:
Angel Streeter Gardner                                                                   Sid Mailhes, PE
Community Outreach Specialist                                                      FDOT Project Manager
(561) 886-8773                                                                               (561) 655-0655
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.                                                              This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please visit the project website at www.southernblvdbridge.com for additional information.

 

Top Stories
This Week in Palm Beach - November 17, 2017
Posted by Stephan Nilson
Published: Friday, 17 November 2017 17:22

Get the news that is important to you in This Week in Palm Beach. November 17, 2017 edition.

Click Here To See Original Full E-Newsletter

TownStaffTo subscribe to This Week in Palm Beach and receive it in your inbox, CLICK HERE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top Stories
Civic Association Holds Forum on Hurricane Recovery & Underground Utilities
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Friday, 17 November 2017 10:41

By Michele Dargan, Special for the Civic Association -- The Palm Beach Civic Association hosted a community forum Thursday morning on hurricane recovery and underground utilities.

More than 85 people attended the event held at The Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea. Deputy Town Manager Jay Boodheshwar spoke about “The Impacts of Hurricane Irma and Lessons Learned.”

Underground Utilities Project Manager Steven Stern presented an update on the town-wide undergrounding project.
Town Manager Tom Bradford and Town Engineer Patricia Strayer also attended to help answer questions from the crowd.
Civic Association President Ned Barnes welcomed everyone.

The Civic Association is dedicating the entire season to the memory of Stanley M. Rumbough, who passed away on September 27. Mr. Rumbough was a Civic Association director for 40 years, chairman for 10 years and chairman emeritus since 2010.
“Many of you knew Stan and loved him as we did,” Mr. Barnes said. “We will miss his leadership and his energy and his positive spirit and his love for the Town of Palm Beach.”

Town Council President Richard Kleid and town council members Bobbie Lindsay, Danielle Moore and Maggie Zeidman attended the forum.

Mr. Barnes asked for a round of applause for members of the police, fire-rescue, public works and other town staff, many of whom sacrificed their own personal needs, to take care of the town and its residents before, during and after the hurricane.

The Impacts of Hurricane Irma

Mr. Boodheshwar presented information from a detailed post-hurricane report on the town’s performance before, during, and after Irma: what worked and what needs improvement next time. The report was compiled from feedback by town staff with input from the elected officials, residents, and members of the business community.

The report will be posted on the town’s website within two weeks.

Approximately 250 members of the town’s staff worked more than 14,000 hours with some form of recovery responsibilities. Many worked more than 16 hours per day to assist in a fast and safe recovery, Mr. Boodheshwar said.

“We require every single employee in town to have at least a couple of basic levels of training through the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) National Incident Management System,” he said. “Collectively, the town’s staff - at all levels - hold 800 certifications, because when disaster strikes we take off our day-to-day hats and put on our emergency management hats and take on different roles.”

Irma was the strongest storm worldwide in 2017 with 185 mph sustained winds and gusts of 200 mph gusts at its peak intensity before it hit Florida. Irma’s peak winds in Palm Beach were 71 miles per hour and occurred between 5:30-6:30 p.m. on September 10.

“We alerted the community 11 days before landfall to make sure people were paying attention and were beginning to prepare,” he said. “It was mostly a wind event, so our issue was fallen vegetation and power outages.”

Damage Assessment

Estimated damages for public property are approximately $400,000 and for private properties approximately $34 million. There were 9,600 power outages in town, with most restored within days of the storm and (mostly) all power restored within a week.

Public Safety Highlights

Fire-Rescue drove every street at 2 AM after the storm went by to do the initial assessment.
Officers responded to approximately 270 calls for service between 2 p.m. on September 9 and 4:30 p.m. on September 11. There were eight arrests and 37 welfare checks. Fire-Rescue responded to 54 incidents (3 medical calls and 51 fire-related - many were false alarms and some tree fires due to live wires hitting vegetation) between 2 p.m. on September 9 and 4:30 p.m. on September 11.

“We did have quite a few calls from concerned family members who aren’t here in town and have elderly parents who didn’t have air conditioners and we gladly went and checked on them to make sure they were okay,” Mr. Boodheshwar said.

Public Works Highlights

The first push to clear roadways was completed by contractor crews from Bergeron Emergency Services and in-house with town crews from Public Works and Public Safety. This work began at 2 a.m. Sept. 11 and was completed by the end of that day.
The contractor crews worked for less than a week and hauled away approximately 72 loads and more than 4,600 cubic yards of debris.

Town crews worked six days a week for several weeks. They collected 1,391 truckloads of debris, totaling over 37,500 cubic yards. All vegetative debris removal was completed by October 10, within 30 days of the storm.

An estimated 3,000 cubic yards of sand was removed from the roads in Reaches 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 and placed back on the beaches.
Of the town-owned street lights, about 70 percent were damaged. Repairs have been completed on nearly all the damaged lights.
At some locations, where standby generators had to operate for long periods, the equipment failed (South Fire, D-8 pump station, and the Public Works facility). Portable generators were brought in until FPL restored power. In other cases, where standby generators did not exist (Par 3, traffic intersections, sewage pump stations) portable generators were provided.

Response and Recovery

Earlier this week, the town was notified that it will receive more than $4 million in reimbursement from FEMA for damages and expenses incurred from Hurricane Matthew last year, Mr. Boodheshwar said.

“We are eligible to receive a pretty significant amount of reimbursement (from Irma),” Mr. Boodheshwar said. “All of our emergency protective measures - police officers and fire-rescue - will be 100 percent reimbursed as well as most of our debris removal and any kind of permanent repair work that needs to be done.”

Opportunities for Improvement

Mr. Boodheshwar said there are approximately 60 to 70 items in the report have been identified by the town as areas that can be improved for future storms.

Among the improvement areas contained in the report:

*Allow pre-designated “owners’ representatives” to return to island in place of owners who are out of town. This will provide for a timelier evaluation of private property conditions during Phase 2 re-entry (when residents are first allowed back on the island).

*Consider allowing companies designated for making emergency repairs on back-up generators to enter the town during Phase 2 re-entry.

*The town’s phone system became disabled and the storm hotlines and rumor control lines were not able to be accessed by employees or the public for several days. Research back-up plans for telephone connectivity in future storms.

*Review staffing and assignments to ensure that personnel are provided adequate rest without excessively long work days or extended on-call after-hours response.

*Coordination with Florida Power & Light (FPL) could have been more organized and the town could have been a better resource for quicker restoration. Further relationship development with FPL will maximize the partnership in the future.

*When possible, push or haul trees blocking roads to the side instead of cutting them up, to allow for replanting.

*Consider supplementing existing generator equipment with additional purchases or rentals to provide full capability.

*Consider obtaining larger equipment for use by the town’s crews to expedite debris removal and engage a specific local contract for sand removal.

*Ensure vendor contracts are clear about locked rates even in the event of an emergency. Research the requirement of performance bonds for major contractors to ensure response and good performance.

*Obtain timelier and more accurate estimates of storm damage and the extent of debris using aerial observations via drones.
“Irma was a big test for the town and we felt, overall, we did okay,” Mr. Boodheshwar said. “We’re not going to rest on our success. We’re going to keep improving. Hopefully, we won’t have another storm next year, but if we do, we feel like we’ll be more prepared.”

Report on Underground Utilities

Mr. Stern thanked the Civic Association for helping to fund the Peer Review of Underground Utilities, which will be presented at the Dec. 12 Town Council meeting.

Regarding the status of the town’s $98.6 million undergrounding project, Mr. Stern said the project is ambitious and well-planned. It improves the safety, reliability and aesthetics on the island, he said.

The project begins at each end of the island – both the north end and the south end – and works its way to the middle over an eight-year period, ending in 2024.

The phase one north construction is 18 percent complete and on schedule and the south construction is 16 percent complete and on schedule. Phase two designs, for both the north and south, are 31 percent complete and on schedule.

The town has collected just under $11 million to date in pre-paid assessments from the community, he said. The town has pre-paid $2.7 million in assessments for town-owned property. Four percent of the project budget has been spent, he said.

There have been no delays in the undergrounding schedule due to Hurricane Irma, Mr. Stern said.

“The undergrounding project is confused frequently with significant Public Works’ water main work occurring in the north part of phase one,” Mr. Stern said. “They are two separate projects, but for convenience and to minimize disruption to residents, we’re trying to get them done at the same time.”

Mr. Stern said the town gathered anecdotal information from other barrier island communities on both coasts as to the effectiveness of underground utilities versus overhead systems during Hurricane Irma.

“We learned that undergrounding systems did much better than overhead systems, Mr. Stern said. “The common themes that we heard were: there was no damage to the underground system; overhead systems did suffer some damage – wires down, poles, and vegetation - which caused some fires; no storm surge to speak of; when there were outages from the underground systems, they were service-related outages, meaning the feeder lines supporting the underground were what was typically affected.”

In Jupiter Inlet Colony, there were no outages during the storm or after. In Jupiter Island, there were no outages during the storm, however they suffered outages after the storm due to repairs off-island from FPL.

In the south side of Gulfstream, the undergrounding is complete, while the north side still runs on overhead utilities, Mr. Stern said. The north did suffer outages; while the south did well, he said.

To get data for other years, the town looked at past FPL reliability reports. Underground systems consistently outperformed overhead systems over a five-year period, the reports say.

“Heavy construction will be limited to seasonality,” Mr. Stern said. “Where we can do so, we’re not going to inconvenience the residents. Another reason for the phasing is to maintain traffic control and to be able to roll the equipment on and off the island. There’s a substantial amount of equipment that needs to be staged.”

The town holds monthly informational meetings in the north end and south end of town regarding the ongoing underground work. Residents may attend and ask questions directly to the staff and crew. The first Friday of every month at 8 a.m., they meet in the south fire house, and the first Monday of every month at 8 a.m., they meet at Annie’s Dock in the north end of town. These meetings are not limited to residents who live in those areas as the information will be pertinent to undergrounding in all areas of town.

For more information about the town’s undergrounding project, visit www.undergrounding.info.

Photo Gallery

Photography provided by Capehart Photography

2017 Civic Assoc. Community Forum Hurricane & Undergrounding

Top Stories
Inlet Maintenance Dredging is Set to Begin – Sand Going on North Beaches
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Thursday, 16 November 2017 16:25

By Michele Dargan, Special for the Civic Association -- The process of putting $8 million worth of sand on north end beaches - at no cost to the town through inlet maintenance dredging - will begin Friday by moving equipment onto the beach, said Coastal Program Manager Rob Weber.

The goal is to move all the equipment onto the beach and have everything ready to go before Thanksgiving so that there will be no work going on from Thursday through Sunday of that weekend. The intent is for residents to have a quiet Thanksgiving, he said.
The actual dredging operation may begin as early as the end of November and end by early January.

CoastalMapReaches1 2 w300Approximately 230,000 cubic yards of sand will be moved, by hydraulic excavation of sand, from the Lake Worth Inlet area and placed on the dry beach starting from the jetty down to Palmo Way.

Immediately following the dredging, a town contractor will move a small portion of the newly-placed sand farther south – from Palmo Way to Colonial Lane. That sand will be moved by dump trucks onto areas where the town has not previously placed sand. The sand is expected to be placed against the seawalls to enhance storm protection.

The beach placement of sand must be done outside of sea turtle nesting season and all construction must be finished by March 1, 2018.

Setting up and taking away the equipment will be confined to daylight hours. Dredging and beach placement activities will be conducted 24 hours a day/seven days a week, however, the contractor will minimize nighttime operations as much as possible to limit noise, Mr. Weber said. The project will use Kenlyn Road for beach access.

The goal is to finish the entire project with as little adverse impact to residents as possible, Mr. Weber said. “They will back the trucks down Kenlyn Road and lay mats in the sand in order to back the trucks entirely onto the beach and be the least disruptive to the roadway,” Mr. Weber said. “There may be temporary closures of the road with flagmen while they’re backing the trucks down. They’ll unload the pipes on the beach with heavy equipment and take the pipes to the far north end near the jetty on the sand. The bulldozers and the pipes will be lined up and ready to go after Thanksgiving.”

Sand will be dredged from the Lake Worth Inlet Entrance Channel, the Port of Palm Beach turning basins in the Lake Worth Lagoon, and the settling basins north of the inlet.

On November 8th, the Palm Beach Harbor Pilots’ Association issued draft restrictions to ships for Lake Worth Inlet, affecting vessel traffic to and from the Port of Palm Beach. Recent soundings showed severe shoaling on the centerline and southern half of the Entrance Channel.

Palm Beach harbor pilots board the ships and steer them in and out of the inlet.

The channel water depth is normally more than 33 feet deep at high tide when sand has not clogged the channel. The alert to ships stated all vessels are restricted to the maximum operating draft of 30 feet at high tide and 27 feet at low tide. Vessels arriving within 3 feet of the maximum allowable draft for the Port of Palm Beach will be restricted to transiting at high tide. Vessels carrying petroleum products are reduced to 29 feet at high tide and 26 feet at low tide."

Mr. Weber and Mayor Gail Coniglio have worked together with the Port of Palm Beach and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to make Palm Beach the recipient of the sand from inlet maintenance dredging. The dredging must occur every two years or the water will be too shallow for the large ships to navigate into the Port.

“This is a collaborative effort between the Army Corps, the Port, and the town that we have been nurturing,” Mayor Coniglio said. “It allows the town to be the beneficiary of the inlet dredging sand at no cost to the taxpayers. It is a savings of $8 million and every two years we look forward to the maintenance dredging and adding the sand, which is so crucial to shore protection.”

The Army Corps obligation is to maintain the inlet for safe navigation and there is budgeted money every two years to accomplish that task, Mayor Coniglio said. “We have all made the commitment that this is the best for the Port, the Army Corps, and the town in order to maintain safe navigation in the inlet and create a healthy shoreline by using the sand in a productive way,” she said. 

The Army Corps has hired Weeks Marine as the contractor and they will use the CR McCaskill cutterhead dredge. “The dredge is going to be attached to the pipeline at all times, so that they don’t have any down time and can continually work 24 hours a day,” he said. “The pipeline is going to come up over the jetty and onto the beach. It’s like a vacuum cleaner. It will pick the sand up and put it right on the beach. They’ll start nourishing the beach at the jetty and move north to south.”

Any rocks in the sand that are greater than ¾ of an inch will be trapped in a cage at the end of the pipeline so that they don’t end up on the beach, Mr. Weber said.

“If the inlet wasn’t there, the sand would come through Singer Island and continue down to the Town of Palm Beach,” Mr. Weber said. “The sand moves from north to south and this will help restore the natural flow of sand.”

If residents have any questions and comments, please direct them to Mr. Weber via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phone at 561-838-5440.

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