• This Week in Palm Beach - February 12, 2016
  • Civic Association Directors & Healthcare Committee Tour Good Samaritan
  • Civic Association Directors Tour the Everglades - Via Airboat!
  • Diagnosing and Treating Heart Arrhythmias
  • Civic Groups Offer to Pay for Public Safety Compensation Study - Council Accepts

 

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This Week in Palm Beach - February 12, 2016
Get the news that is important to you in This Week in Palm Beach. February 5, 2016 edition.
Civic Association Directors & Healthcare Committee Tour Good Samaritan
Civic Association directors and our Healthcare Committee, led by Jeff Levitt, participated this week in a tour of Good Samaritan Medical Center. The center is one of our corporate partners.
Civic Association Directors Tour the Everglades - Via Airboat!
Civic Association directors participated this week in a tour of the Everglades given by our corporate partner, the Everglades Foundation.
Diagnosing and Treating Heart Arrhythmias
By Mark Nosacka, CEO Good Samaritan Medical Center.The heart pumps about 2,000 gallons of blood through the body and beats about 100,000 times a day. Normally, electricity flows through the heart and produces the familiar thumping pattern heard through a stethoscope. But if an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, is detected, an electrophysiology study may be recommended to determine the cause of the abnormal rhythm.
CELLebrate2016 at the Gardens Mall to Spotlight Scripps Florida Science
Cutting edge science, a host of exciting interactive displays, plus dozens of Scripps Florida scientists will be on hand at the Gardens Mall on Saturday, March 5, 2016 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for the seventh annual CELLebrate Scripps Florida Science Day.
Civic Groups Offer to Pay for Public Safety Compensation Study - Council Accepts
BREAKING: Council accepts proposal from Civic Association and Police Foundation to underwrite study.
Cool Temps and Waves in Palm Beach this Week
SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH TUESDAY EVENING...
There are Polite Ways to Avoid the Flu
By: Dr. Michael Dennis, Civic Association Director. It has been a challenging flu season (and not over yet) with many suffering from symptoms including, but not limited to, fever, cough, respiratory problems, muscle aches, tummy troubles, and fatigue.
Top Stories
This Week in Palm Beach - February 12, 2016
Posted by Stephan Nilson
Published: Friday, 12 February 2016 17:19

Get the news that is important to you in This Week in Palm Beach. February 5, 2016 edition.

 To subscribe to This Week in Palm Beach and receive it in your inbox, CLICK HERE

 
 

THIS WEEK IN PALM BEACH
The News Palm Beachers Need to Know

February 12, 2016
UNDERGROUNDING
Undergrounding Forum
Sponsored by the Town of Palm Beach and the Palm Beach Civic Association

Find out the facts 
Get your questions answered
 
 
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
10:00 am
 
Town Council Chambers - Town Hall
360 S. County Road

Presentation by Thomas G. Bradford, Town Manager Patricia Strayer, Public Works
 
Presentation followed by
question and answer period

Everyone Welcome!  
Palm Beach Sets Path for Residents to Appeal Utilities Assessments
Property owners can challenge the underground utilities assessment to their properties if they believe the amount is wrong.  
CIVIC ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL AWARDS LUNCHEON
 
The Civic Association is pleased to announce that Bob Wright will be the keynote speaker.

Bill Brooks Award Winner
David Mack
For Exceptional Service to the Town of Palm Beach

Monday, March 14, 2016
12:00 noon

At The Breakers, Palm Beach

Palm Beach County Commissioners
Delay Possible Sales Tax Vote
Palm Beach County Commissioners voted 7-0 Tuesday to hold off any action on a potential November sales tax vote until County Administrator Verdenia Baker gets details from the county's municipalities on how they'd spend their 40 percent cut of whatever would be generated.
Mark Nosacka, CEO Good Samaitan
Civic Association Directors and Healthcare Committee Tour Good Samaritan
Civic Association directors and our Healthcare Committee, led by Jeff Levitt, participated this week in a tour of the hospital given by our corporate partner, Good Samaritan Medical Center.
SHORE PROTECTION NEWS
Palm Beach Transfer Plant Again Pumping Sand to North End Beach
The town's sand transfer plant, which broke down Nov. 27 because of an electrical failure, is running again. It's been operating since Jan. 20, according to the town.
Phipps Beach Project Halfway Complete Despite Weather Delays
 The Phipps Ocean Park beach nourishment project is about halfway done, town officials said this week. Workers have placed about 500,000 cubic yards of sand and have another 500,000 to go, Coastal Coordinator Rob Weber told the Town Council on Tuesday.
Read More (Palm Beach Daily News)

Consultant Reviewing Report on
Breakers, Clarke Avenue Erosion
Winter weather has caused thin, narrow shorelines throughout town, Coastal Coordinator Rob Weber told the Town Council on Tuesday.
Read More (Palm Beach Daily News)
CIVIC ASSOCIATION
DIRECTORS LUNCHEON

Town of Palm Beach Update
Keynote Speaker
Michael Pucillo, Town Council President

Undergrounding Update
Jeff Smith, Undergrounding Task Force Chairman

Thursday, March 3, 2016
12 Noon
The Beach Club

Civic Association Directors Only

 Click Here to Register Online

or

Call to Register

561-655-0820
WEST PALM DEVELOPS
Billionaire Jeff Greene Building WPB Primary School for Advanced Kids
Palm Beach billionaire Jeff Greene believes there's a need for a new style of primary school in central Palm Beach County that will teach children the skills necessary to succeed in a global economy. So he will open his own, The Greene School, in West Palm Beach this fall.
CIVIC ASSOCIATION
DIRECTORS IN THE NEWS
Autism Speaks Gala Honors Co-founder Suzanne Wright, Raises Millions for Organizations
Bob & Suzanne Wright
The guiding light of autism advocacy was honored at a dinner dance hosted by the organization she co-founded a decade ago. Her co-founder is husband Bob Wright, Chairman and CEO of the Civic Association.
The event, hosted by Autism Speaks, took place Feb. 5 at the Flagler Museum and honored Palm Beach and Nantucket resident Suzanne Wright for her work in raising international awareness of autism.
Anne Anderson
Irish Ambassador Anne Anderson Honored at Luncheon
The ambassador of Ireland to the United States was the honoree and speaker at a luncheon hosted by Civic Association Director Bill Finneran.
SOLD OUT!
Civic Association
Breakfast with Our Visionary Leader
Steve Ross
Monday - February 15. 2016 - 9:00 a.m.
Colony Hotel / Members Only Event
SOLD OUT!
CIVIC ASSOCIATION EVENT 
Ann Norton Sculpture Garden
Private Tour and Luncheon at the
Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens
 
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
11:00 am
2051 South Flagler Drive,
West Palm Beach


CIVIC ASSOCIATION MEMBERS ONLY
 

MEETINGS & EVENTS
Monday, February 15, 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM 
CIVIC ASSOCIATION BREAKFAST WITH OUR VISIONARY LEADER 
Steve Ross 
The Colony Hotel | Pavilion Room

February 16, 9:30 AM 
Planning and Zoning Commission Meeting 
Town Hall Council Chambers

February 17, 9:30 AM
Civic Association Executive Committee Meeting
 
Civic Association Community Room

February 17, 9:30 AM 
Landmarks Preservation Commission Meeting 
Town Hall Council Chambers

Thursday, February 18, 10:00 AM 
Civic Association Town Beautification Committee 
Civic Association in the Paramount
 
Tuesday, February 23, 11:00 AM
Private Tour and Luncheon
Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens
 
February 23, 10:00 am
Undergrounding Presentation and Town Hall Forum
Town Council Chambers - Town Hall
February 24, 10:00 am
Undergrounding Presentation and Public Forum
South Fire Rescue Station 
March 1, 9:30 am 
Underground Utilities Task Force Meeting and Town Hall Forum
Town Council Chambers - Town Hall

March 3, Noon 
Civic Association Directors Luncheon 
The Beach Club 
 
Palm Beach Accepts Donation that Will Pay for Pension Study
The Town Council unanimously approved Tuesday a proposal by two nonprofit civic groups to jointly pay for a study of the total compensation packages offered to police officers and firefighters by 22 regional municipalities.
The Palm Beach Civic Association and the Palm Beach Police Foundation have agreed to split the cost of the study.
New Council Members Sworn In at Palm Beach Town Council Meeting
Maggie Zeidman and Bobbie Lindsay were sworn in Tuesday by Judge Lisa Small.
Incumbent Richard Kleid also took the oath of office.
Good Samaritan
Medical Center
Diagnosing and Treating Arrhythmias
The heart pumps about 2,000 gallons of blood through the body and beats about 100,000 times a day. Normally, electricity flows through the heart and produces the familiar thumping pattern heard through a stethoscope. But if an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, is detected, an electrophysiology study may be recommended to determine the cause of the abnormal rhythm.
Read More (Civic Association News)
TOWN SQUARE PROJECT NEWS
Rep. Frankel Issues Statement Recognizing Palm Beach Project
Rep. Lois Frankel 
 D-Fla
Rep. Lois Frankel, D-Fla., has issued a statement that was published in the Congressional Record on Feb 2 recognizing the Palm Beach town square project. The congresswoman is addressing the Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.
 
Ms. FRANKEL of Florida. "Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize the unveiling of the newly renovated Palm Beach Town Square, and to thank those involved in the project for their hard work. On Sunday, January 31st, the Town of Palm Beach dedicated the newly renovated Town Square, a symbol of Palm Beach's rich and unique history."
Board Will Continue Raising Money for Town Square Improvements
The Town Council lauded Bill Bone and others Tuesday for organizing the Jan. 31 celebration of the $7.9 million Town Square revitalization project.
More than 2,000 people, including U.S. Congresswoman Lois Frankel and Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, visited the square that Sunday, 86 years after the original Memorial Fountain was dedicated, Bone said.
CELLebrate2016 at the Gardens Mall to Spotlight Scripps Florida Science
Cutting edge science, a host of exciting interactive displays, plus dozens of Scripps Florida scientists will be on hand at the Gardens Mall on Saturday, March 5, 2016 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for the seventh annual CELLebrate Scripps Florida Science Day.
Palm Beach Changes Private Construction Inspection Rules 
From now on, the town will have better oversight of construction projects inspected by private companies on the island.

Palm Beach Committee OKs Waiving Permit Fees for Town-Funded Charities
The Ordinances, Rules and Standards Committee recommended Thursday that the Town Council waive charitable solicitation permit fees for each groups' first three fundraising events. Fees range from $200 to $420 per event.
Read More (Palm Beach Daily News)
Dr. Michael Dennis
There are Polite Ways to Avoid the Flu 
By Dr. Michael Dennis,
Civic Association Director & Healthcare Committee Member
It has been a challenging flu season (and not over yet) with many suffering from symptoms including, but not limited to, fever, cough, respiratory problems, muscle aches, tummy troubles, and fatigue. Many have voiced frustration that they became ill despite being vaccinated. This is not surprising since this season's vaccines were only effective against 23 percent of viruses.

Palm Beach Recreation Department
To Visit
Recreation 
Department
Site
Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce 
To See
Chamber Events 
 
 
Top Stories
Civic Association Directors & Healthcare Committee Tour Good Samaritan
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Friday, 12 February 2016 13:13

Civic Association directors and our Healthcare Committee, led by Jeff Levitt, participated this week in a tour of Good Samaritan Medical Center. The center is one of our corporate partners.

GoodSamTourMarkNosacka-w600Image: Mark Nosacka, CEO Good Samaritan

The purpose of the tour was to see the center's operation and services they offer, and understand how they are caring for patients.

Mark Nosacka, CEO of Good Samaritan, and many of their doctors conducted the tour.

GSMC3-w600
Jeff Levitt (Chair Health Care Committee), Diana Barrett, Robin Martin, William Lickle 

Click Here to See the Gallery

Top Stories
Civic Association Directors Tour the Everglades - Via Airboat!
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Friday, 12 February 2016 11:47

Civic Association directors participated this week in a tour of the Everglades given by our corporate partner, the Everglades Foundation.

EvergladesAerial1The purpose of the trip was to educate our directors about the major issues with the Everglades and South Florida water supply.

Eric Eikenberg, CEO of the Everglades Foundation, and Dr. Christopher McVoy, a scientist at the Everglades Foundation conducted the tour.

Stay tuned for a report, more photos, and a video about what we found.

Click Here to See the Photo Gallery

 

 

Top Stories
Diagnosing and Treating Heart Arrhythmias
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Thursday, 11 February 2016 15:22

By Mark Nosacka, CEO Good Samaritan Medical Center.
The heart pumps about 2,000 gallons of blood through the body and beats about 100,000 times a day. Normally, electricity flows through the heart and produces the familiar thumping pattern heard through a stethoscope. But if an irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia, is detected, an electrophysiology study may be recommended to determine the cause of the abnormal rhythm.

MarkNosacka

Image: Mark Nosacka, CEO Good Samaritan Medical Center.

Electrophysiology tests are commonly performed to identify where an arrhythmia is in the heart and find the best course of treatment. Information generated during these tests can also predict a future cardiac event, evaluate the effectiveness of certain medications to control the irregular heartbeat, and/or decide if an implantable defibrillator, pacemaker or catheter ablation procedure is necessary.

Good Samaritan Medical Center cares for patients with known or suspected cardiovascular diseases through its Cardiac and Vascular Institute. The institute offers electrophysiology services through its new EP lab, which includes highly advanced equipment designed to diagnose and treat abnormal heart rhythms.

An electrophysiology test typically lasts between two and four hours but may take longer if additional treatments are performed at the same time.

HeartRhythm-1024x682Abnormal results from an electrophysiology test can identify numerous conditions, such as atrial fibrillation (abnormal electrical discharges in the heart that cause an irregular heartbeat), ventricular tachycardia (rapid heartbeats that start in the ventricles), and Wolff-Parkinson- White syndrome (a condition in which there is an extra electrical pathway in the heart).

The Cardiac & Vascular Institute at Good Samaritan Medical Center has a team of highly skilled cardiologists, heart surgeons and other health care professionals who care for patients with known or suspected coronary heart disease. Good Samaritan is also an accredited Chest Pain Center with Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) through the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care. Hospitals that have received SCPC accreditation provide more efficient and effective evaluation, as well as appropriate and rapid treatment of patients with chest pain and other heart attack symptoms.

To learn more about your heart, attend our free heart health screening events that occur the second Thursday of every month. Register online at GoodSamaritanMC.com.

Hot Topics
CELLebrate2016 at the Gardens Mall to Spotlight Scripps Florida Science
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Thursday, 11 February 2016 15:05

Cutting edge science, a host of exciting interactive displays, plus dozens of Scripps Florida scientists will be on hand at the Gardens Mall on Saturday, March 5, 2016 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for the seventh annual CELLebrate Scripps Florida Science Day.


This celebration of science, located throughout the Garden Mall's lower level, is a free community science festival that features intriguing science demonstrations, and fun, interactive exhibits designed to spark the curiosity and imaginations of children and adults alike.

CELLebrate2016 promises a day filled with intriguing scientific exhibits and displays, a hands-on approach to science that has been enchanting Palm Beach County families since the Gardens Mall event was first introduced in 2010.

CELLebrate2016 will highlight the exciting biomedical research being done by Scripps Florida scientists with displays that feature work from the institute’s research departments including Cancer Biology, Metabolism & Aging, Neuroscience, Infectious Diseases, Chemistry and Molecular Therapeutics. In addition, the robotic technology group will have its own booth, and will feature a robotic arm display.

The chemistry exhibit, always a favorite, will feature everything from exploding hydrogen bubbles to the extreme cold effects of liquid nitrogen. Robotics will feature displays about Scripps Florida’s drug screening capabilities—how specialized robots help scientists search for new therapeutic compounds – and miniature plastic robots ‘printed’ in 3D.

Since its founding in 2004, Scripps Florida has established deep roots in Palm Beach County, while pursuing its mission as a nonprofit organization to advance human health and train the next generation of scientists.  

CELLebrate2016 offers a chance for the public to meet the scientists behind the research and learn about some of the amazing scientific breakthroughs taking place right here in Palm Beach County.

About The Scripps Research Institute
The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. An institution that evolved from the Scripps Metabolic Clinic founded by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1924, the institute now employs about 2,700 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists—including two Nobel laureates—work toward their next discoveries. The institute's graduate program, which awards PhD degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. For more information, see www.scripps.edu.

Top Stories
Civic Groups Offer to Pay for Public Safety Compensation Study - Council Accepts
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Tuesday, 09 February 2016 11:54

BREAKING: Council accepts proposal from Civic Association and Police Foundation to underwrite study.

townhall600Before making any changes to police and firefighters’ retirement benefits, the Town Council will be able to see how other municipalities compensate their public safety workers.

Two nonprofit civic groups have offered to jointly pay for a study of the total compensation packages that 22 other regional municipalities provide to their police and firefighters.

Pat Cooper, secretary and treasurer of the Palm Beach Civic Association, and John Scarpa, president of the Palm Beach Police Foundation, made the offer Monday to the council’s Finance and Taxation Committee.

“Our executive committee has expressed serious concerns about recruitment and retention in public safety,” Cooper said.

Read More (Palm Beach Daily News)

Top Stories
Cool Temps and Waves in Palm Beach this Week
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Monday, 08 February 2016 16:23

SMALL CRAFT ADVISORY IN EFFECT THROUGH TUESDAY EVENING...

DayAtBeachColdFrontWavesSynopsis: A COLD FRONT WILL MOVE ACROSS THE REGION TONIGHT BRINGING HAZARDOUS...GUSTY NORTHWEST WINDS TO NEAR GALE FORCE. A NORTHEAST SWELL WILL CONTINUE ACROSS THE ATLANTIC WATERS BUT WILL SLOWLY SUBSIDE THROUGH TUESDAY. SURFACE HIGH PRESSURE WILL SETTLE SOUTHEASTWARD ACROSS THE REGION THROUGH LATE WEEK WITH ANOTHER COLD FRONT FORECAST BY LATE IN THE WEEKEND.

Marine Forecast

Tonight
Near the coast...west winds 15 to 20 knots increasing to 20 to 25 knots during the evening. Offshore...west winds 15 to 20 knots increasing to 25 to 30 knots during the evening. Seas 3 to 5 feet with occasional seas to 6 feet along the coast and 6 to 8 feet with occasional seas to 10 feet in the gulf stream. Dominant period 8 seconds. North northeast swell 3 to 5 feet. Intracoastal waters rough in exposed areas. A slight chance of showers after midnight.
 
Tuesday
West winds 20 to 25 knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet with occasional seas to 5 feet along the coast and 7 to 9 feet with occasional seas to 11 feet in the gulf stream. Dominant period 6 seconds. North swell around 3 feet. Intracoastal waters a moderate chop.
 
Tuesday Night
West northwest winds 15 to 20 knots along the coast to west northwest 20 to 25 knots in the gulf stream. Seas 2 to 4 feet with occasional seas to 5 feet along the coast and 6 to 8 feet with occasional seas to 10 feet in the gulf stream. Dominant period 6 seconds. North swell around 3 feet in the evening. Intracoastal waters a moderate chop.
 
Wednesday
Northwest winds 15 to 20 knots with gusts to around 30 knots. Seas 2 to 4 feet with occasional seas to 5 feet along the coast and 6 to 8 feet with occasional seas to 10 feet in the gulf stream. Dominant period 8 seconds. Intracoastal waters a moderate chop.
 
Northend Beach [10 sec.]

 
Wednesday Night
Northwest winds around 15 knots along the coast to northwest 15 to 20 knots in the gulf stream. Seas 2 to 4 feet with occasional seas to 5 feet along the coast and 5 to 7 feet with occasional seas to 9 feet in the gulf stream. Intracoastal waters a moderate chop.
 
Thursday
North winds 15 to 20 knots. Seas 3 to 5 feet with occasional seas to 6 feet along the coast and 5 to 7 feet with occasional seas to 9 feet in the gulf stream. Intracoastal waters a moderate chop.
 
Thursday Night
North northeast winds 10 to 15 knots along the coast to northeast 15 to 20 knots in the gulf stream. Seas 2 to 4 feet with occasional seas to 5 feet along the coast and 5 to 7 feet with occasional seas to 9 feet in the gulf stream. Intracoastal waters choppy in exposed areas.
 
 Northend Beach [24 sec.]
 
Friday
East winds 10 to 15 knots. Seas 2 to 3 feet along the coast and 3 to 5 feet with occasional seas to 6 feet in the gulf stream. Intracoastal waters a moderate chop.
 
Friday Night
East southeast winds around 5 knots becoming south late in the evening...then becoming west after midnight. Seas 2 to 3 feet. Intracoastal waters a light chop.
 
Saturday
West northwest winds around 10 knots along the coast to northwest 10 to 15 knots in the gulf stream. Seas 2 to 3 feet along the coast and 2 to 4 feet with occasional seas to 5 feet in the gulf stream. Intracoastal waters a light chop.

Click to See More (NOAA)

 

 

 

Top Stories
There are Polite Ways to Avoid the Flu
Posted by R. Michael Brown
Published: Monday, 08 February 2016 16:09

By: Dr. Michael Dennis, Civic Association Director.

It has been a challenging flu season (and not over yet) with many suffering from symptoms including, but not limited to, fever, cough, respiratory problems, muscle aches, tummy troubles, and fatigue.


Dr.MichaelDennisImage: Dr. Michael Dennis

Many have voiced frustration that they became ill despite being vaccinated. This is not surprising since this season’s vaccines were only effective against 23 percent of viruses. Infectious disease specialists were already aware that most of the viruses circulating had mutated from those selected nearly one year ago for the development of vaccines and thus later do not recognize any component of the current virus strain. Researchers are trying to produce a universal vaccine that would stimulate immunity against proteins inside the virus, which don’t change from year to year, but there are restrictions in the process. Significant among them is that there is a lack of incentive for the pharmaceutical industry to produce new vaccines. Influenza vaccine sales produce very little revenue, are difficult to make and are extremely labor intensive. One would hope the industry would see a compassionate opportunity to serve the public in return for its massive income from other medications.

There is no doubt that improved vaccines targeted against specific viruses would have an important role to play especially for those with weak immune systems, in the elderly category, or in childhood. But notice the word “viruses” – not bacteria. A recent study examined clinician treatment practices with confirmed influenza and found that only 12 percent were treated with an anti-viral medication such as Tamiflu, Oseltamivir or Zanamivir, but at least 40 percent were prescribed an antibiotic, which has no effect whatsoever against the virus. It may be comforting to leave your appointment with a prescription, but you must realize that you are taking a medication you very likely don’t need instead of an antiviral that might be very helpful. And there can be complications from the antibiotic including rash and diarrhea. Less than 1 percent of flu victims have a bacterial secondary infection requiring an antibiotic; this is an issue that you should discuss in earnest with your physician.

The fundamental truth is that the influenza vaccine is a mediocre product, only effective 65 percent in an average year, and does not work as well in children under age 2 or in the elderly as it does in healthy patients. It is cheap with few side effects and may cause pain at the injection site. Yet, despite its inefficiencies, in many cases it is well worth taking the shot to prevent prolonged symptoms or hospitalization if one contracts a recognized virus.

Fortunately there are some very simple maneuvers that can dramatically reduce your chance of exposure, i.e. avoidance mechanisms that can protect one from infection.

fist-bumpFist bumping – thought by some to be discourteous, even insulting or political mimicry – can eliminate the chance of transferring organisms by the traditional handshake. As many as ten bacterial or viral components can be cultured on one’s palm (not all are harmful) at any one time, so this maneuver is a wise substitute. Hand sanitizers are especially effective in preventing the spread of disease in public places such as the shopping cart or your steering wheel after valet parking.

Obviously, you should politely avoid circumstances where you are with an afflicted individual in a close environment, i.e. at the bridge table. Those cards you are dealt might make you feel like the dummy for several weeks. And who has not been vigorously embraced in greeting by an acquaintance followed by a kiss on the cheek only to have that person step back and with a raspy voice interrupted by a hoarse cough tell how they have just spent the last four days in bed with a high fever? Be considerate. I readily acknowledge that this topic is not as engaging as island politics, but at least you might remain well to enjoy the drama. To your good health.

Dr. Michael Dennis is a Palm Beach Civic Association director and chairman of the Florida Atlantic University Schmidt College of Medicine.

Thefts from Unlocked Vehicles On the Rise

Crime Prevention Alert: The Palm Beach Police Department is alerting residents of a recent increase of thefts from vehicles. In most of these cases the vehicle has been left unlocked and the keys have been left in their vehicle.

Read more ...

Civic Association Public Safety Committee Meets

The Civic Association Public Safety Committee met this week with Fire-Rescue Chief Darrel Donatto and EMS Chief James Duane and discussed the major Police and Fire-Rescue issues in the Town of Palm Beach.

Read more ...

Explosions Focus New Light on Aging Infrastructure

Civic Association Analysis Shows Surge in Electrical Incidents

A Civic Association Special Report by: Paul Scicchitano.

Civic Association Director Warren Belmar was asleep in his bedroom on the third floor of the Sun and Surf Condominium when something woke him up early in the morning of Oct. 8.

Read more ...